abolitionary

abolition

[ab-uh-lish-uhn]
noun
1.
the act of abolishing: the abolition of war.
2.
the state of being abolished; annulment; abrogation: the abolition of unjust laws; the abolition of unfair taxes.
3.
the legal prohibition and ending of slavery, especially of slavery of blacks in the U.S.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin abolitiōn- (stem of abolitiō), equivalent to abolit(us) effaced, destroyed, past participle of abolēre (cf. abolish) + -iōn- -ion

abolitionary, adjective
nonabolition, noun
proabolition, adjective


1, 2. annihilation, eradication, elimination; nullification, invalidation, revocation, repeal.


2. establishment.
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World English Dictionary
abolition (ˌæbəˈlɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of abolishing or the state of being abolished; annulment
2.  (often capital) (in British territories) the ending of the slave trade (1807) or the ending of slavery (1833): accomplished after a long campaign led by William Wilberforce
3.  (often capital) (in the US) the emancipation of the slaves, accomplished by the Emancipation Proclamation issued in 1863 and ratified in 1865
 
[C16: from Latin abolitio, from abolēre to destroy]
 
abo'litionary
 
adj
 
abo'litionism
 
n
 
abo'litionist
 
n, —adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

abolition
1520s, from Fr. abolition, from L. abolitionem (nom. abolitio) "abolition," from abolitus, pp. of abolere (see abolish). Specific application to "opposition to the black slave trade as a political question" is first attested 1788.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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