abstractional

abstraction

[ab-strak-shuhn]
noun
1.
an abstract or general idea or term.
2.
the act of considering something as a general quality or characteristic, apart from concrete realities, specific objects, or actual instances.
3.
an impractical idea; something visionary and unrealistic.
4.
the act of taking away or separating; withdrawal: The sensation of cold is due to the abstraction of heat from our bodies.
5.
secret removal, especially theft.
6.
absent-mindedness; inattention; mental absorption.
7.
Fine Arts.
a.
the abstract qualities or characteristics of a work of art.
b.
a work of art, especially a nonrepresentational one, stressing formal relationships.

Origin:
1540–50; < Late Latin abstractiōn- (stem of abstractiō) separation. See abstract, -ion

abstractional, adjective
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World English Dictionary
abstraction (æbˈstrækʃən)
 
n
1.  absence of mind; preoccupation
2.  the process of formulating generalized ideas or concepts by extracting common qualities from specific examples
3.  an idea or concept formulated in this way: good and evil are abstractions
4.  logic See also lambda calculus an operator that forms a class name or predicate from any given expression
5.  an abstract painting, sculpture, etc
6.  the act of withdrawing or removing
 
ab'stractive
 
adj
 
ab'stractively
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

abstraction ab·strac·tion (āb-strāk'shən, əb-)
n.

  1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.

  2. Exclusive mental concentration; absent-mindedness.

  3. A malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.

  4. The selection of a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.

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