absurdity

[ab-sur-di-tee, -zur-]
noun, plural absurdities.
1.
the state or quality of being absurd.
2.
something absurd.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English absurdite (< Middle French) < Late Latin absurditās. See absurd, -ity

superabsurdity, noun, plural superabsurdities.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To absurdities
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

absurdity
1520s, from M.Fr. absurdité, from L. absurditatem (nom. absurditas) "dissonance, incongruity," from absurdus "out of tune, senseless," from ab- intens. prefix + surdus "dull, deaf, mute" (see susurration). The main modern sense (also present in L.) is a fig. one,
"out of harmony with reason or propriety."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
However, fictional humor is slowly giving way to factual absurdities in popular
  culture, experts say.
The fallacies and absurdities in the rest of your piece are even clearer.
The article epitomizes the absurdities that seem to be becoming part of
  scientific exploration.
It works for a while but rapidly degenerates into absurdities.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature