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accompany

[uh-kuhm-puh-nee] /əˈkʌm pə ni/
verb (used with object), accompanied, accompanying.
1.
to go along or in company with; join in action:
to accompany a friend on a walk.
2.
to be or exist in association or company with:
Thunder accompanies lightning.
3.
to put in company with; cause to be or go along; associate (usually followed by with):
He accompanied his speech with gestures.
4.
Music. to play or sing an accompaniment to or for.
verb (used without object), accompanied, accompanying.
5.
to provide the musical accompaniment.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English accompanye < Middle French accompagnier. See ac-, company
Related forms
nonaccompanying, adjective
reaccompany, verb (used with object), reaccompanied, reaccompanying.
well-accompanied, adjective
Synonyms
1. Accompany, attend, convoy, escort mean to go along with someone (or something). To accompany is to go along as an associate on equal terms: to accompany a friend on a shopping trip. Attend implies going along with, usually to render service or perform duties: to attend one's employer on a business trip. To convoy is to accompany (especially ships) with an armed guard for protection: to convoy a fleet of merchant vessels. To escort is to accompany in order to protect, guard, honor, or show courtesy: to escort a visiting dignitary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for accompanying
  • Usually, hot barley tea was the accompanying beverage.
  • The plexuses accompanying some of these arteries have important communications with other nerves.
  • The nerve also sends a small branch to the bone, which enters the nutrient foramen with the accompanying artery.
  • accompanying the records were some highly peculiar liner notes.
  • The accompanying review mentions your role in tempering the face of development over the past decade.
  • The way it works is that a piece of meat and its accompanying seasonings are placed in an airtight bag.
  • accompanying this pervasive dumbing-down of the curriculum has been a wholesale change in school philosophy.
  • The accompanying lentils only made the dish drearier.
  • The sheer amount of accompanying commentary and philological footnotes is one of them.
  • She has the ability to sing elaborate phrases while accompanying herself on the violin, creating a riveting and intense spectacle.
British Dictionary definitions for accompanying

accompany

/əˈkʌmpənɪ; əˈkʌmpnɪ/
verb -nies, -nying, -nied
1.
(transitive) to go along with, so as to be in company with or escort
2.
(transitive) foll by with. to supplement: the food is accompanied with a very hot mango pickle
3.
(transitive) to occur, coexist, or be associated with
4.
to provide a musical accompaniment for (a performer)
Derived Forms
accompanier, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Old French accompaignier, from compaingcompanion1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for accompanying

accompany

v.

early 15c., "to be in company with," from Middle French accompagner, from Old French acompaignier (12c.) "take as a companion," from à "to" (see ad-) + compaignier, from compaign (see companion). Related: Accompanied; accompanying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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