accosting

accost

[uh-kawst, uh-kost]
verb (used with object)
1.
to confront boldly: The beggar accosted me for money.
2.
to approach, especially with a greeting, question, or remark.
3.
(of prostitutes, procurers, etc.) to solicit for sexual purposes.
noun
4.
a greeting.

Origin:
1570–80; < Late Latin accostāre to be or put side by side. See ac-, coast

accostable, adjective
unaccostable, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To accosting
Collins
World English Dictionary
accost (əˈkɒst)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to approach, stop, and speak to (a person), as to ask a question, accuse of a crime, solicit sexually, etc
 
n
2.  rare a greeting
 
[C16: from Late Latin accostāre to place side by side, from Latin costa side, rib]
 
ac'costable
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

accost
1570s, from M.Fr. accoster "move up to" (16c.), from L.L. accostare "come up to the side," from L. ad- "to" + costa "rib, side" (see coast). The original notion is of fleets of warships attacking an enemy's coast.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;