accouterment

[uh-koo-ter-muhnt, -truh-]
noun
1.
personal clothing, accessories, etc.
2.
the equipment, excluding weapons and clothing, of a soldier.
Also, especially British, accoutrement.


Origin:
1540–50; < Middle French accou(s)trement. See accouter, -ment

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

accoutrements
1540s, from M.Fr. accoustrement (Mod.Fr. accoutrement), from accoustrer, probably from O.Fr. acostrer "arrange," originally "sew up," from *consutura "a sewing," from L. consutus, pp. of consuere "to sew together," from con- + suere "to sew" (see suture).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He wins laughs with such apparently archaic accoutrements as a ventriloquist's
  dummy and a ukulele.
They will report on board in working suits, carrying their arms and
  accoutrements.
Most action figures come with tiny accoutrements that are almost certain to get
  lost.
Local priests have as their patrons, for the buildings and the accoutrements of
  a costly church, the local thief.
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