acquisition

[ak-wuh-zish-uhn]
noun
1.
the act of acquiring or gaining possession: the acquisition of real estate.
2.
something acquired; addition: a recent acquisition to the museum.
3.
Linguistics. the act or process of achieving mastery of a language or a linguistic rule or element: child language acquisition; second language acquisition.

Origin:
1375–1425; Middle English adquisicioun, a(c)quisicion < Latin acquīsītiōn- (stem of acquīsītiō), equivalent to acquīsīt(us), past participle of acquīrere to acquire + -iōn- -ion

acquisitional, adjective
acquisitor [uh-kwiz-i-ter] , noun
preacquisition, noun
proacquisition, adjective
reacquisition, noun
superacquisition, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
acquisition (ˌækwɪˈzɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of acquiring or gaining possession
2.  something acquired
3.  a person or thing of special merit added to a group
4.  astronautics the process of locating a spacecraft, satellite, etc, esp by radar, in order to gather tracking and telemetric information
 
[C14: from Latin acquīsītiōn-, from acquīrere to acquire]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

acquisition
late 14c., "act of obtaining," from L. acquisitionem, from stem of acquirere "get in addition," from ad- "extra" + quærere "to seek to obtain" (see query). Meaning "thing obtained" is from late 15c. The vowel change of -ae- to -i- in Latin is due to a L. phonetic rule
involving unaccented syllables in compounds.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

acquisition ac·qui·si·tion (āk'wĭ-zĭsh'ən)
n.
The empirical demonstration in psychology of an increase in the strength of the conditioned response in successive trials in which the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are paired.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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Example sentences
We must target our acquisitions to those areas of known research activity on
  our campuses.
Negotiate terms of acquisitions and agreements with contributing producers.
The colours in the image result from changes in the surface that occurred
  between acquisitions.
Apple's not known for using its gobs of cash to make big acquisitions.
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