acrimonies

acrimony

[ak-ruh-moh-nee]
noun
sharpness, harshness, or bitterness of nature, speech, disposition, etc.: The speaker attacked him with great acrimony.

Origin:
1535–45; < Latin ācrimōnia, equivalent to ācri- (stem of ācer) sharp, sour + -mōnia -mony


bitterness, animosity, spitefulness, asperity, spite.


goodwill, civility, kindness, politeness.
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World English Dictionary
acrimony (ˈækrɪmənɪ)
 
n , pl -nies
bitterness or sharpness of manner, speech, temper, etc
 
[C16: from Latin ācrimōnia, from ācer sharp, sour]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

acrimony
1540s, "quality of being acrid," from L. acrimonia "sharpness, pungency of taste," from acer "sharp" (fem. acris, neut. acre; see acrid) + -monia suffix of action, state, condition. Figurative extension to "sharpness of temper" is first recorded 1610s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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