adduce

[uh-doos, uh-dyoos]
verb (used with object), adduced, adducing.
to bring forward in argument or as evidence; cite as pertinent or conclusive: to adduce reasons in support of a constitutional amendment.

Origin:
1610–20; < Latin addūcere to bring into, equivalent to ad- ad- + dūcere to lead

adduceable, adducible, adjective
adducer, noun
unadduceable, adjective
unadduced, adjective
unadducible, adjective

adduce, deduce, induce.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
adduce (əˈdjuːs)
 
vb
(tr) to cite (reasons, examples, etc) as evidence or proof
 
[C15: from Latin addūcere to lead or bring to]
 
ad'ducent
 
adj
 
ad'ducible
 
adj
 
ad'duceable
 
adj
 
adduction
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

adduce
1610s, from L. adducere "lead to, bring to," from ad- "to" + ducere "to lead" (see duke).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Instead, many intellectuals maintained, facts depend on the perspective from
  which are adduced.
Within the evidence adduced, close observance of details may optimize the
  edition in five or six cases.
Nothing you or anyone else has adduced here suggests that.
The judicial officer shall make his determination upon the evidence adduced at
  the hearing.
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