ADI

ado

[uh-doo]
noun
busy activity; bustle; fuss.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English (north) at do, a phrase equivalent to at to (< Old Norse, which used at with the infinitive) + do do1

à deux, adieu, ado (see synonym study at the current entry).


flurry; confusion, upset, excitement; hubbub, noise, turmoil. Ado, to-do, commotion, stir, tumult suggest a great deal of fuss and noise. Ado implies a confused bustle of activity, a considerable emotional upset, and a great deal of talking: Much Ado About Nothing. To-do now more commonly used, may mean merely excitement and noise and may be pleasant or unpleasant: a great to-do over a movie star. Commotion suggests a noisy confusion and babble: commotion at the scene of an accident. Stir suggests excitement and noise, with a hint of emotional cause: The report was followed by a tremendous stir in the city. Tumult suggests disorder with noise and violence: a tumult as the mob stormed the Bastille.


calm, peace, tranquillity.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
ado (əˈduː)
 
n
bustling activity; fuss; bother; delay (esp in the phrases without more ado, with much ado)
 
[C14: from the phrase at do a to-do, from Old Norse at to (marking the infinitive) + do1]

ADO
 
abbreviation for
accumulated day off

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

ado
late 13c., compounded from at do, dialectal in Norse influenced areas of England for to do, as some Scandinavian languages used at with infinitive of a verb where Modern English uses to. For sense development, cf. to-do.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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