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[uh-jurn] /əˈdʒɜrn/
verb (used with object)
to suspend the meeting of (a club, legislature, committee, etc.) to a future time, another place, or indefinitely:
to adjourn the court.
to defer or postpone to a later time:
They adjourned the meeting until the following Monday.
to defer or postpone (a matter) to a future meeting of the same body.
to defer or postpone (a matter) to some future time, either specified or not specified.
verb (used without object)
to postpone, suspend, or transfer proceedings.
to go to another place:
to adjourn to the parlor.
Origin of adjourn
1300-50; Middle English ajo(u)rnen < Middle French ajo(u)rner, equivalent to a- ad- + jorn- < Latin diurnus daily; see journal, journey
Related forms
preadjourn, verb
readjourn, verb
unadjourned, adjective
Can be confused
adjoin, adjourn. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for adjourned
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • After the procession they adjourned to the amphitheater for the exercises.

    Sixty Years of California Song Margaret Blake-Alverson
  • After the meal they all adjourned to the veranda, where the air was cool and the view extensive.

  • The meeting then adjourned, to be reassembled soon to hear the reply of the emperor.

  • The club then adjourned to the outside, all except those who sat on the bench.

  • At the end of his speech, apparently, the House adjourned, to resume the consideration of the subject on the following day.

    Patrick Henry Moses Coit Tyler
British Dictionary definitions for adjourned


(intransitive) (of a court, etc) to close at the end of a session
to postpone or be postponed, esp temporarily or to another place
(transitive) to put off (a problem, discussion, etc) for later consideration; defer
(intransitive) (informal)
  1. to move elsewhere: let's adjourn to the kitchen
  2. to stop work
Derived Forms
adjournment, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French ajourner to defer to an arranged day, from a- to + jour day, from Late Latin diurnum, from Latin diurnus daily, from diēs day
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for adjourned



early 14c., ajournen, "assign a day" (for convening or reconvening), from Old French ajourner (12c.) "meet" (at an appointed time), from the phrase à jorn "to a stated day" (à "to" + journ "day," from Latin diurnus "daily;" see diurnal).

The sense is to set a date for a re-meeting. Meaning "to close a meeting" (with or without intention to reconvene) is from early 15c. Meaning "to go in a body to another place" (1640s) is colloquial. The unhistorical -d- was added 16c. Related: Adjourned; adjourning.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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