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admire

[ad-mahyuh r] /ædˈmaɪər/
verb (used with object), admired, admiring.
1.
to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
2.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
verb (used without object), admired, admiring.
3.
to feel or express admiration.
4.
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
Idioms
5.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He's admiring of his brother's farm.
Origin of admire
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin admīrārī, equivalent to ad- ad- + mīrārī (in Medieval Latin mīrāre) to wonder at, admire
Related forms
admirer, noun
preadmire, verb (used with object), preadmired, preadmiring.
preadmirer, noun
quasi-admire, verb, quasi-admired, quasi-admiring.
unadmired, adjective
Synonyms
1. esteem, revere, venerate.
Antonyms
1. despise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for admirer
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Could you lend an admirer a dollar and a half to buy a hymn-book with?

  • Never would she attempt to divert a glance from her cousin's admirer.

    The Innocent Adventuress Mary Hastings Bradley
  • You forget that my husband is a traveller, and an admirer of Americans and things American.

    At The Sign Of The Eagle Gilbert Parker
  • "As Miss Dalton's admirer, I hope rumor adds that," said she, hastily.

    The Daltons, Volume I (of II) Charles James Lever
  • Fraser, fit to handle his weight in wildcats, as an admirer had once put it, found no trouble in following.

    A Texas Ranger William MacLeod Raine
British Dictionary definitions for admirer

admire

/ədˈmaɪə/
verb (transitive)
1.
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
2.
(archaic) to wonder at
Derived Forms
admirer, noun
admiring, adjective
admiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin admīrāri to wonder at, from ad- to, at + mīrāri to wonder, from mīrus wonderful
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for admirer
n.

c.1600, agent noun from admire (v.). "In common speech, a lover" [Johnson], a sense recorded from 1704.

admire

v.

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari "to wonder at" (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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