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admonish

[ad-mon-ish] /ædˈmɒn ɪʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to caution, advise, or counsel against something.
2.
to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner:
The teacher admonished him about excessive noise.
3.
to urge to a duty; remind:
to admonish them about their obligations.
Origin
late Middle English
1275-1325
1275-1325; late Middle English admonish, amonesche, admonesse, amoness, Middle English a(d)monest (with -t later taken as past participle suffix) < Anglo-French, Old French amonester < Vulgar Latin *admonestāre, apparently derivative of Latin admonēre to remind, give advice to (source of -est- uncertain), equivalent to ad- ad- + monēre to remind, warn
Related forms
admonisher, noun
admonishingly, adverb
admonishment, noun
preadmonish, verb (used with object)
unadmonished, adjective
Synonyms
1. See warn. 2. rebuke, censure, upbraid. See reprimand.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for admonishing
  • Perhaps it is admonishing us to grab life by the horns and escape a life of futility and pathetic shallowness.
  • They ignored the scoreboard message admonishing them to go and the periodic pleas over the loudspeaker, which they booed.
  • His business is the care of his flock, his medium is words--thrilling words, admonishing or consoling words.
  • Unless the conduct is egregious, get the jury out before admonishing.
  • Wrapping him into the greatcoat slung on his arm and admonishing him to be quiet, he smuggled him up the gangway.
  • Respondent contends that its investigation was adequate and that it acted appropriately in admonishing the teacher.
British Dictionary definitions for admonishing

admonish

/ədˈmɒnɪʃ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to reprove firmly but not harshly
2.
to advise to do or against doing something; warn; caution
Derived Forms
admonisher, admonitor, noun
admonition (ˌædməˈnɪʃən) noun
admonitory, adjective
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Vulgar Latin admonestāre (unattested), from Latin admonēre to put one in mind of, from monēre to advise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for admonishing
admonish
early 14c., from O.Fr. amonester (12c.), from V.L. admonestare, from L. admonere "advise, remind," from ad- "to" + monere "advise, warn" (see monitor). The -d- was restored on L. model. The ending was infl. by words in -ish (e.g. astonish). Related: Admonitory (1590s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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