aground

[uh-ground]
adverb, adjective
on or into the ground; in a stranded condition or state: The ship ran aground.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English. See a-1, ground

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World English Dictionary
aground (əˈɡraʊnd)
 
adv, —adj
(postpositive) on or onto the ground or bottom, as in shallow water

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

aground
c.1300, from a- "on" (see a- (1)) + ground.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Running aground, he was obliged to abandon his vessel.
Even sailors who didn't run aground here told tales of the howling winds and
  birds.
Here, wind-whipped tides can build seas big enough to capsize small boats and
  currents strong enough to drive big ships aground.
It worked to a point, until the water became too shallow and the ships ran
  aground.
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