aim to

aim

[eym]
verb (used with object)
1.
to position or direct (a firearm, ball, arrow, rocket, etc.) so that, on firing or release, the discharged projectile will hit a target or travel along a certain path.
2.
to intend or direct for a particular effect or purpose: to aim a satire at snobbery.
verb (used without object)
3.
to point or direct a gun, punch, etc., toward: He aimed at the target but missed it.
4.
to strive; try (usually followed by to or at ): We aim to please. They aim at saving something every month.
5.
to intend: She aims to go tomorrow.
6.
to direct efforts, as toward an object: The satire aimed at modern greed.
7.
Obsolete. to estimate; guess.
noun
8.
the act of aiming or directing anything at or toward a particular point or target.
9.
the direction in which a weapon or missile is pointed; the line of sighting: within the cannon's aim.
10.
the point intended to be hit; thing or person aimed at: to miss one's aim.
11.
something intended or desired to be attained by one's efforts; purpose: whatever his aim in life may be.
12.
Obsolete. conjecture; guess.
Idioms
13.
take aim, to sight a target: to take aim and fire.

Origin:
1275–1325; late Middle English aimen < Anglo-French a(e)smer, eimer, Old French aesmer < Vulgar Latin *adaestimāre, equivalent to Latin ad- ad- + aestimāre (see estimate); replacing Middle English amen < Old French (dial.) amer < Latin aestimāre

aimer, noun
aimful, adjective
aimfully, adverb
misaim, verb, noun
unaimed, adjective
unaiming, adjective
underaim, noun
underaim, verb
well-aimed, adjective


1. point. 8. sighting. 10. target, objective. 11. goal; intent, design. Aim, end, object all imply something that is the goal of one's efforts. Aim implies that toward which one makes a direct line, refusing to be diverted from it: a nobleness of aim; one's aim in life. End emphasizes the goal as a cause of efforts: the end for which one strives. Object emphasizes the goal as that toward which all efforts are directed: the object of years of study.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
aim (eɪm)
 
vb
1.  to point (a weapon, missile, etc) or direct (a blow) at a particular person or object; level
2.  (tr) to direct (satire, criticism, etc) at a person, object, etc
3.  (intr; foll by at or an infinitive) to propose or intend: we aim to leave early
4.  (intr; often foll by at or for) to direct one's efforts or strive (towards): to aim at better communications; to aim high
 
n
5.  the action of directing something at an object
6.  the direction in which something is pointed; line of sighting (esp in the phrase to take aim)
7.  the object at which something is aimed; target
8.  intention; purpose
 
[C14: via Old French aesmer from Latin aestimāre to estimate]

AIM
 
abbreviation for
(in Britain) Alternative Investment Market

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

aim
early 14c., "to estimate, calculate," from O.Fr. esmar, from L. aestimare "appraise" (see estimation); current meaning apparently developed from "esteem," to "calculate," through "calculate with a view to action" (c.1400), then "calculate the direction of a missile" (1570s).
The noun is recorded from c.1400, originally "guess;" meaning "action of aiming" is from early 15c. (to take aim, originally make aim); that of "thing intended, purpose" is from 1620s. Related: Aimless (1620s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
AIM
American Indian Movement
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

aim to

Try or intend to do something, as in We aim to please, or She aims to fly to California. This term derives from aim in the sense of "direct the course of something," such as an arrow or bullet. [Colloquial; c. 1600]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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