alice james

James

[jeymz]
noun
1.
Also called James the Great. one of the 12 apostles, the son of Zebedee and brother of the apostle John. Matt. 4:21.
2.
the person identified in Gal. 1:19 as a brother of Jesus: probably the author of the Epistle of St. James.
3.
Also called James the Less. ("James the son of Alphaeus") one of the 12 apostles. Matt. 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15.
4.
Alice, 1848–92, U.S. diarist, sister of Henry and William James.
5.
C(yril) L(ionel) R(obert) 1901–89, Trinidadian author, historian, and political activist.
6.
Daniel, Jr ("Chappie") 1920–78, U.S. Air force officer: first black general.
7.
Henry, 1811–82, U.S. philosopher and author (father of Henry and William James).
8.
Henry, 1843–1916, U.S. novelist and critic in England (brother of William James).
9.
Jesse (Woodson) [wood-suhn] , 1847–82, U.S. outlaw and legendary figure.
10.
Will, 1892–1942, U.S. author and illustrator.
11.
William, 1842–1910, U.S. psychologist and pragmatist philosopher (brother of Henry James).
12.
a river flowing E from the W part of Virginia to Chesapeake Bay. 340 miles (547 km) long.
13.
a river flowing S from central North Dakota through South Dakota to the Missouri River. 710 miles (1143 km) long.
14.
one of the books of the new testament. Abbreviation: Jas.
15.
a male given name.

Origin:
Middle English Jame(s) < Old French < Vulgar Latin *Jacomus, for *Jacobus, alteration of Late Latin Jacōbus Jacob; compare Spanish Jaime, Italian Giacomo

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
James (dʒeɪmz)
 
n
1.  Clive. born 1939, Australian journalist, critic and broadcaster. His books include the memoirs Unreliable Memoirs (1980) and North Face of Soho (2006) and the novel Brilliant Creatures
2.  Henry 1843--1916, British novelist, short-story writer, and critic, born in the US Among his novels are Washington Square (1880), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Bostonians (1886), The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903), and The Golden Bowl (1904)
3.  Jesse (Woodson). 1847--82, US outlaw
4.  P(hyllis) D(orothy), Baroness James of Holland Park. born 1920, British detective novelist. Her books include Death of an Expert Witness (1977), Original Sin (1994), and Death in Holy Orders (2001)
5.  William, brother of Henry James. 1842--1910, US philosopher and psychologist, whose theory of pragmatism is expounded in Essays in Radical Empiricism (1912). His other works include The Will to Believe (1897), The Principles of Psychology (1890), and The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902)
6.  New Testament
 a.  known as James the Great. one of the twelve apostles, a son of Zebedee and brother to John the apostle (Matthew 4:21). Feast day: July 25 or April 30
 b.  known as James the Less. one of the twelve apostles, son of Alphaeus (Matthew 10:3). Feast day: May 3 or Oct 9
 c.  known as James the brother of the Lord. a brother or close relative of Jesus (Mark 6:3; Galatians 1:19). Feast day: Oct 23
 d.  the book ascribed to his authorship (in full The Epistle of James)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

James
masc. proper name, name of two of Christ's disciples, late 12c. M.E. vernacular form of L.L. Jacomus (cf. O.Fr. James, Sp. Jaime, It. Giacomo), altered from L. Jacobus (see Jacob). The Welsh form was Iago, the Cornish Jago.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

James definition


(1.) The son of Zebedee and Salome; an elder brother of John the apostle. He was one of the twelve. He was by trade a fisherman, in partnership with Peter (Matt. 20:20; 27:56). With John and Peter he was present at the transfiguration (Matt. 17:1; Mark 9:2), at the raising of Jairus's daughter (Mark 5:37-43), and in the garden with our Lord (14:33). Because, probably, of their boldness and energy, he and John were called Boanerges, i.e., "sons of thunder." He was the first martyr among the apostles, having been beheaded by King Herod Agrippa (Acts 12:1, 2), A.D. 44. (Comp. Matt. 4:21; 20:20-23). (2.) The son of Alphaeus, or Cleopas, "the brother" or near kinsman or cousin of our Lord (Gal. 1:18, 19), called James "the Less," or "the Little," probably because he was of low stature. He is mentioned along with the other apostles (Matt. 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15). He had a separate interview with our Lord after his resurrection (1 Cor. 15:7), and is mentioned as one of the apostles of the circumcision (Acts 1:13). He appears to have occupied the position of head of the Church at Jerusalem, where he presided at the council held to consider the case of the Gentiles (Acts 12:17; 15:13-29: 21:18-24). This James was the author of the epistle which bears his name.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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