ambassadorship

ambassador

[am-bas-uh-der, -dawr]
noun
1.
a diplomatic official of the highest rank, sent by one sovereign or state to another as its resident representative (ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary)
2.
a diplomatic official of the highest rank sent by a government to represent it on a temporary mission, as for negotiating a treaty.
3.
a diplomatic official serving as permanent head of a country's mission to the United Nations or some other international organization.
4.
an authorized messenger or representative. Abbreviation: Amb., amb.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English am-, embass(i)adour, imbassadore < Anglo-French ambassateur, ambassaduer < Italian ambassatore, dialectal Italian ambassadore, equivalent to ambass- (see embassy) -atore, -adore < Latin -ātōrem accusative of -ātor -ator

ambassadorial [am-bas-uh-dawr-ee-uhl, -dohr-] , adjective
ambassadorially, adverb
ambassadorship, noun
preambassadorial, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
ambassador (æmˈbæsədə)
 
n
1.  short for ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary; a diplomatic minister of the highest rank, accredited as permanent representative to another country or sovereign
2.  ambassador extraordinary a diplomatic minister of the highest rank sent on a special mission
3.  ambassador plenipotentiary a diplomatic minister of the first rank with treaty-signing powers
4.  (US) ambassador-at-large an ambassador with special duties who may be sent to more than one government
5.  an authorized representative or messenger
 
[C14: from Old French ambassadeur, from Italian ambasciator, from Old Provençal ambaisador, from ambaisa (unattested) mission, errand; see embassy]
 
usage  The gender-neutral form is ambassador
 
am'bassadress
 
fem n
 
ambassadorial
 
adj
 
am'bassadorship
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ambassador
late 14c., from M.Fr. ambassadeur, from O.Fr. embassator, via Prov. or O.Sp. from L. ambactus "a servant, vassal," from Celt. amb(i)actos "a messenger, servant," from PIE *ambhi- "about" + *ag- "drive, lead." Cf. embassy. Forms in am- and em- were used indiscriminately 17c.-18c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Ambassador definition


In the Old Testament the Hebrew word _tsir_, meaning "one who goes on an errand," is rendered thus (Josh. 9:4; Prov. 13:17; Isa. 18:2; Jer. 49:14; Obad. 1:1). This is also the rendering of _melits_, meaning "an interpreter," in 2 Chr. 32:31; and of _malak_, a "messenger," in 2 Chr. 35:21; Isa. 30:4; 33:7; Ezek. 17:15. This is the name used by the apostle as designating those who are appointed by God to declare his will (2 Cor. 5:20; Eph. 6:20). The Hebrews on various occasions and for various purposes had recourse to the services of ambassadors, e.g., to contract alliances (Josh. 9:4), to solicit favours (Num. 20:14), to remonstrate when wrong was done (Judg. 11:12), to condole with a young king on the death of his father (2 Sam. 10:2), and to congratulate a king on his accession to the throne (1 Kings 5:1). To do injury to an ambassador was to insult the king who sent him (2 Sam. 10:5).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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