amiable

[ey-mee-uh-buhl]
adjective
1.
having or showing pleasant, good-natured personal qualities; affable: an amiable disposition.
2.
friendly; sociable: an amiable greeting; an amiable gathering.
3.
agreeable; willing to accept the wishes, decisions, or suggestions of another or others.
4.
Obsolete. lovable or lovely.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Middle French < Late Latin amīcābilis amicable

amiability, amiableness, noun
amiably, adverb
quasi-amiable, adjective
quasi-amiably, adverb
unamiable, adjective
unamiableness, noun
unamiably, adverb

amiable, amicable.


1. gracious. 2. amicable.


1. rude. 2. unfriendly, hostile.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
amiable (ˈeɪmɪəbəl)
 
adj
having or displaying a pleasant or agreeable nature; friendly
 
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin amīcābilisamicable]
 
amia'bility
 
n
 
'amiableness
 
n
 
'amiably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

amiable
mid-14c., from O.Fr. amiable, from L.L. amicabilis "friendly," from amicus "friend," related to amare "to love" (see Amy). The form confused in O.Fr. with amable "lovable," from L. amare. Reborrowed later in proper L. form as amicable.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
When smiling, all of us look more approachable and amiable.
It helped that he was so amiable and so lacking in conceit—not universal
  qualities among journalists.
Young readers who find deskwork intimidating will enjoy reading about an
  amiable mouse who shares their struggles.
It was a quite amiable conversation.
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