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ammonite1

[am-uh-nahyt] /ˈæm əˌnaɪt/
noun
1.
the coiled, chambered fossil shell of an ammonoid.
Origin
1700-1710
1700-10; < New Latin Ammonites < Medieval Latin (cornū) Ammōn(is) (literally, horn of Ammon) + -ītes -ite1; fossil so called from its resemblance to the horn of Jupiter Ammon
Related forms
ammonitic
[am-uh-nit-ik] /ˌæm əˈnɪt ɪk/ (Show IPA),
adjective
ammonitoid
[uh-mon-i-toid] /əˈmɒn ɪˌtɔɪd/ (Show IPA),
adjective

ammonite2

[am-uh-nahyt] /ˈæm əˌnaɪt/
noun
1.
a nitrogenous mixture consisting chiefly of dried animal fats, usually obtained from livestock carcasses, and used as a fertilizer.
Origin
1600-10; ammo(nium) + nit(rat)e

Ammonite

[am-uh-nahyt] /ˈæm əˌnaɪt/
noun
1.
an inhabitant of Ammon.
adjective
2.
of or relating to the Ammonites.
Origin
1605-15; Ammon + -ite1
Related forms
Ammonitish, adjective
pre-Ammonite, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for ammo-nite

ammonite1

/ˈæməˌnaɪt/
noun
1.
any extinct marine cephalopod mollusc of the order Ammonoidea, which were common in Mesozoic times and generally had a coiled partitioned shell. Their closest modern relative is the pearly nautilus
2.
the shell of any of these animals, commonly occurring as a fossil
Derived Forms
ammonitic (ˌæməˈnɪtɪk) adjective
Word Origin
C18: from New Latin Ammōnītēs, from Medieval Latin cornū Ammōnis, literally: horn of Ammon

ammonite2

/ˈæməˌnaɪt/
noun
1.
an explosive consisting mainly of ammonium nitrate with smaller amounts of other substances, such as TNT
2.
a nitrogenous fertilizer made from animal wastes
Word Origin
C20: from ammo(nium) + ni(tra)te
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ammo-nite

ammonite

n.

"cephalopod mollusk," 1758, from French (Breyn, 1732), "better established" [Century Dictionary] by French zoologist Jean Guillaume Bruguière (c.1750-1798) in 1789, from Medieval Latin (cornu) Ammonis "horn of Ammon," the Egyptian god of life and reproduction, who was depicted with ram's horns, which the fossils resemble. The resemblance also was noted in ancient times.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ammo-nite in Science
ammonite
  (ām'ə-nīt')   
Any of the ammonoids belonging to the order Ammonitida and living during the Jurassic and the Cretaceous Periods. Ammonites had a thick, very ornamental chambered shell with highly defined, wavy sutures between the chambers.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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ammo-nite in the Bible

the usual name of the descendants of Ammon, the son of Lot (Gen. 19:38). From the very beginning (Deut. 2:16-20) of their history till they are lost sight of (Judg. 5:2), this tribe is closely associated with the Moabites (Judg. 10:11; 2 Chr. 20:1; Zeph. 2:8). Both of these tribes hired Balaam to curse Israel (Deut. 23:4). The Ammonites were probably more of a predatory tribe, moving from place to place, while the Moabites were more settled. They inhabited the country east of the Jordan and north of Moab and the Dead Sea, from which they had expelled the Zamzummims or Zuzims (Deut. 2:20; Gen. 14:5). They are known as the Beni-ammi (Gen. 19:38), Ammi or Ammon being worshipped as their chief god. They were of Semitic origin, and closely related to the Hebrews in blood and language. They showed no kindness to the Israelites when passing through their territory, and therefore they were prohibited from "entering the congregation of the Lord to the tenth generation" (Deut. 23:3). They afterwards became hostile to Israel (Judg. 3:13). Jephthah waged war against them, and "took twenty cities with a very great slaughter" (Judg. 11:33). They were again signally defeated by Saul (1 Sam. 11:11). David also defeated them and their allies the Syrians (2 Sam. 10:6-14), and took their chief city, Rabbah, with much spoil (2 Sam. 10:14; 12:26-31). The subsequent events of their history are noted in 2 Chr. 20:25; 26:8; Jer. 49:1; Ezek. 25:3, 6. One of Solomon's wives was Naamah, an Ammonite. She was the mother of Rehoboam (1 Kings 14:31; 2 Chr. 12:13). The prophets predicted fearful judgments against the Ammonites because of their hostility to Israel (Zeph. 2:8; Jer. 49:1-6; Ezek. 25:1-5, 10; Amos 1:13-15). The national idol worshipped by this people was Molech or Milcom, at whose altar they offered human sacrifices (1 Kings 11:5, 7). The high places built for this idol by Solomon, at the instigation of his Ammonitish wives, were not destroyed till the time of Josiah (2 Kings 23:13).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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