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8 Words That Are Older Than You Think

amuck

[uh-muhk] /əˈmʌk/
adjective
1.
mad with murderous frenzy.
noun
2.
amok.
Idioms
3.
run / go amuck,
  1. to rush about in a murderous frenzy:
    The maniac ran amuck in the crowd, shooting at random.
  2. to rush about wildly; lose self-control:
    When the nightclub caught fire the patrons ran amuck, blocking the exits.
Origin
1510-1520
1510-20; variant of amok
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for amuck
  • The motor-driven mail wagons of this city have run amuck.
  • Executive power run amuck is now met with silence or approval.
  • There was no malice in his behavior, simply unchecked enthusiasms run amuck.
  • Imagination run amuck in a tale created for the purpose of the artiness of the production.
  • What was once thought to be hormones run amuck can now be explained with modern medical technology.
  • It is a sympathetic nervous system gone amuck that for some unknown reason will not turn off.
  • All of these matters are an outcome of excessive proofing requirements gone amuck.
  • It is government gone amuck and government gone seriously wrong.
  • He recently had no working computer after he managed to stop a virus that was running amuck in his only machine.
  • If one side dominates over the other, you rubber stamp decisions or you allow people's biases to run amuck.
British Dictionary definitions for amuck

amok

/əˈmʌk; əˈmɒk/
noun
1.
a state of murderous frenzy, originally observed among Malays
adverb
2.
run amok, to run about with or as if with a frenzied desire to kill
Word Origin
C17: from Malay amoq furious assault

amuck

/əˈmʌk/
noun, adverb
1.
a variant of amok
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for amuck
adv.

17c., variant of amok; treated as a muck by Dryden, Byron, etc., and defended by Fowler, who considered amok didacticism.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
16
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