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anguished

[ang-gwisht] /ˈæŋ gwɪʃt/
adjective
1.
feeling, showing, or accompanied by anguish.
2.
resulting from or produced by anguish.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English; see anguish, -ed3
Related forms
nonanguished, adjective
unanguished, adjective

anguish

[ang-gwish] /ˈæŋ gwɪʃ/
noun
1.
excruciating or acute distress, suffering, or pain:
the anguish of grief.
verb (used with object)
2.
to inflict with distress, suffering, or pain.
verb (used without object)
3.
to suffer, feel, or exhibit anguish:
to anguish over the loss of a loved one.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English anguisse < Old French < Latin angustia tight place, equivalent to angust(us) narrow + -ia -ia; cf. anxious; akin to anger
Synonyms
1. agony, torment, torture. See pain.
Antonyms
1. delight, comfort, relief.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for anguished
  • Peck often played morally anguished heroes who displayed grace under fire.
  • Brokers reported anguished calls from retail clients begging for a piece of the action.
  • All sorts of sober sociological theories could be advanced to explain the anguished turmoil of adolescence.
  • But the tone is of fatalistic humour, not anguished exasperation.
  • What happened next has disappeared into an anguished blur of guilt and confusion.
  • Even that would foreshadow a further anguished transfer of populations.
  • So far he seems to be emerging from the typically anguished national debate with his stature perhaps even enhanced.
  • The dancers kept striking anguished poses, for no discernible reason.
  • The environment was so hostile that some anguished mothers ended their children's lives.
  • Time has not paled his incisive, brooding and anguished quasi-biography.
British Dictionary definitions for anguished

anguish

/ˈæŋɡwɪʃ/
noun
1.
extreme pain or misery; mental or physical torture; agony
verb
2.
to afflict or be afflicted with anguish
Word Origin
C13: from Old French angoisse a strangling, from Latin angustia narrowness, from angustus narrow

anguished

/ˈæŋɡwɪʃt/
adjective
1.
feeling or expressing anguish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for anguished

anguish

n.

c.1200, "acute bodily or mental suffering," from Old French anguisse, angoisse "choking sensation, distress, anxiety, rage," from Latin angustia (plural angustiae) "tightness, straitness, narrowness;" figuratively "distress, difficulty," from ang(u)ere "to throttle, torment" (see anger (v.)).

v.

early 14c., intransitive and reflexive; mid-14c., transitive, from Old French anguissier (Modern French angoisser), from anguisse (see anguish (n.)). Related: Anguished; anguishing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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