annunciatory

annunciate

[uh-nuhn-see-eyt]
verb (used with object), annunciated, annunciating.
to announce.

Origin:
1350–1400; < Medieval Latin annūnciātus, for Latin annūntiātus, past participle of annūntiāre to make known. See announce, -ate1

annunciable, adjective
annunciative, annunciatory [uh-nuhn-see-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
unannunciable, adjective
unannunciative, adjective

annunciate, enunciate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

annunciator

[uh-nuhn-see-ey-ter]
noun
1.
an announcer.
2.
a signaling apparatus, generally used in conjunction with a buzzer, that displays a visual indication when energized by electric current.

Origin:
1745–55; annūntiātor; see annunciate, -tor

annunciatory [uh-nuhn-see-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
annunciate (əˈnʌnsɪˌeɪt, -ʃɪ-)
 
vb
(tr) a less common word for announce
 
[C16: from annunciātus, Medieval Latin misspelling of annuntiātus, past participle of Latin annuntiāre; see announce]
 
annunci'ation
 
n
 
annunciative
 
adj
 
annunciatory
 
adj

annunciator (əˈnʌnsɪˌeɪtə)
 
n
1.  a device that gives a visual indication as to which of a number of electric circuits has operated, such as an indicator in a hotel showing in which room a bell has been rung
2.  a device giving an audible signal indicating the position of a train
3.  a less common word for announcer

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

annunciate
1530s, from pp. adj. annunciate, from L. annunciatus, misspelling of annuntiatus, pp. of annuntiare (see announce).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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