anointer

anoint

[uh-noint]
verb (used with object)
1.
to rub or sprinkle on; apply an unguent, ointment, or oily liquid to.
2.
to smear with any liquid.
3.
to consecrate or make sacred in a ceremony that includes the token applying of oil: He anointed the new high priest.
4.
to dedicate to the service of God.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English anoynten, derivative of anoynt, enoynt (past participle) < Old French enoint < Latin inūnctus anointed (past participle of inungere), equivalent to in- in-2 + ung- smear with oil + -tus past participle suffix

anointer, noun
anointment, noun
reanoint, verb (used with object)
reanointment, noun
self-anointed, adjective
unanointed, adjective
well-anointed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
anoint (əˈnɔɪnt)
 
vb
1.  to smear or rub over with oil or an oily liquid
2.  to apply oil to as a sign of consecration or sanctification in a sacred rite
 
[C14: from Old French enoint, from enoindre, from Latin inunguere, from in-² + unguere to smear with oil]
 
a'nointer
 
n
 
a'nointment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

anoint
c.1300 (implied in anointing), from O.Fr. enoint "smeared on," pp. of enoindre "smear on," from L. inunguere, from in- "on" + unguere "to smear" (see unguent). Originally in ref. to grease or oil smeared on for medicinal purposes; its use in the Coverdale Bible in ref.
to Christ (cf. The Lord's Anointed, see chrism) has spiritualized the word.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Anoint definition


The practice of anointing with perfumed oil was common among the Hebrews. (1.) The act of anointing was significant of consecration to a holy or sacred use; hence the anointing of the high priest (Ex. 29:29; Lev. 4:3) and of the sacred vessels (Ex. 30:26). The high priest and the king are thus called "the anointed" (Lev. 4:3, 5, 16; 6:20; Ps. 132:10). Anointing a king was equivalent to crowning him (1 Sam. 16:13; 2 Sam. 2:4, etc.). Prophets were also anointed (1 Kings 19:16; 1 Chr. 16:22; Ps. 105:15). The expression, "anoint the shield" (Isa. 21:5), refers to the custom of rubbing oil on the leather of the shield so as to make it supple and fit for use in war. (2.) Anointing was also an act of hospitality (Luke 7:38, 46). It was the custom of the Jews in like manner to anoint themselves with oil, as a means of refreshing or invigorating their bodies (Deut. 28:40; Ruth 3:3; 2 Sam. 14:2; Ps. 104:15, etc.). This custom is continued among the Arabians to the present day. (3.) Oil was used also for medicinal purposes. It was applied to the sick, and also to wounds (Ps. 109:18; Isa. 1:6; Mark 6:13; James 5:14). (4.) The bodies of the dead were sometimes anointed (Mark 14:8; Luke 23:56). (5.) The promised Deliverer is twice called the "Anointed" or Messiah (Ps. 2:2; Dan. 9:25, 26), because he was anointed with the Holy Ghost (Isa. 61:1), figuratively styled the "oil of gladness" (Ps. 45:7; Heb. 1:9). Jesus of Nazareth is this anointed One (John 1:41; Acts 9:22; 17:2, 3; 18:5, 28), the Messiah of the Old Testament.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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