Anthologist

anthology

[an-thol-uh-jee]
noun, plural anthologies.
1.
a book or other collection of selected writings by various authors, usually in the same literary form, of the same period, or on the same subject: an anthology of Elizabethan drama; an anthology of modern philosophy.
2.
a collection of selected writings by one author.

Origin:
1630–40; < Latin anthologia < Greek: collection of poems, literally, gathering of flowers, equivalent to anthológ(os) flower-gathering (antho- antho- + -logos, adj. derivative of légein to pick up, collect) + -ia -ia

anthological [an-thuh-loj-i-kuhl] , adjective
anthologically, adverb
anthologist, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
anthology (ænˈθɒlədʒɪ)
 
n , pl -gies
1.  a collection of literary passages or works, esp poems, by various authors
2.  any printed collection of literary pieces, songs, works of art, etc
 
[C17: from Medieval Latin anthologia, from Greek, literally: a flower gathering, from anthos flower + legein to collect]
 
anthological
 
adj
 
an'thologist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

anthology
1630s, from L. anthologia, from Gk. anthologia "flower-gathering," from anthos "a flower" (see anther) + logia "collection, collecting," from legein "gather" (see lecture). Modern sense (which emerged in Late Gk.) is metaphoric, "flowers" of verse, small poems by various writers gathered together.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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