anti climax

anticlimax

[an-ti-klahy-maks]
noun
1.
an event, conclusion, statement, etc., that is far less important, powerful, or striking than expected.
2.
a descent in power, quality, dignity, etc.; a disappointing, weak, or inglorious conclusion: After serving as president, he may find life in retirement an anticlimax.
3.
a noticeable or ludicrous descent from lofty ideas or expressions to banalities or commonplace remarks: We were amused by the anticlimax of the company's motto: “For God, for country, and for Acme Gasworks.”

Origin:
1720–30; anti- + climax

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World English Dictionary
anticlimax (ˌæntɪˈklaɪmæks)
 
n
1.  a disappointing or ineffective conclusion to a series of events, etc
2.  a sudden change from a serious subject to one that is disappointing or ludicrous
3.  rhetoric a descent in discourse from the significant or important to the trivial, inconsequential, etc
 
anticlimactic
 
adj
 
anticli'mactically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

anticlimax
"the addition of a particular which suddenly lowers the effect," 1727, coined by Alexander Pope (1688-1744), from anti- + climax. Anticlimactic (also anti-climactic) is attested from 1898.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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