anti empiric

empiric

[em-pir-ik]
noun
1.
a person who follows an empirical method.
2.
a quack; charlatan.
adjective

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin empīricus < Greek empeirikós experienced, equivalent to em- em-2 + peir- (stem of peirân to attempt) + -ikos -ic

antiempiric, noun, adjective
nonempiric, noun, adjective
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World English Dictionary
empiric (ɛmˈpɪrɪk)
 
n
1.  a person who relies on empirical methods
2.  a medical quack; charlatan
 
adj
3.  a variant of empirical
 
[C16: from Latin empīricus, from Greek empeirikos practised, from peiran to attempt]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

empiric
c.1600, from L. empiricus, from Gk. empeirikos, from empeiria "experience" (see empirical). From 16c.-19c. often as a noun with sense "quack doctor."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

empiric em·pir·ic (ěm-pēr'ĭk)
n.

  1. One who is guided by practical experience rather than precepts or theory.

  2. An unqualified or dishonest practitioner; a charlatan.

adj.
  1. Empirical.

  2. Relating to a school of ancient Greek medicine in which a physician relied on experience and precedent in the observation and treatment of disease, and on analogical reasoning in discovering new diseases.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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