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music

[myoo-zik] /ˈmyu zɪk/
noun
1.
an art of sound in time that expresses ideas and emotions in significant forms through the elements of rhythm, melody, harmony, and color.
2.
the tones or sounds employed, occurring in single line (melody) or multiple lines (harmony), and sounded or to be sounded by one or more voices or instruments, or both.
3.
musical work or compositions for singing or playing.
4.
the written or printed score of a musical composition.
5.
such scores collectively.
6.
any sweet, pleasing, or harmonious sounds or sound:
the music of the waves.
7.
appreciation of or responsiveness to musical sounds or harmonies:
Music was in his very soul.
8.
Fox Hunting. the cry of the hounds.
Idioms
9.
face the music, to meet, take, or accept the consequences of one's mistakes, actions, etc.:
He's squandered his money and now he's got to face the music.
Origin
1200-1250
1200-50; Middle English musike < Latin mūsica < Greek mousikḕ (téchnē) (the art) of the Muse, feminine of mousikós, equivalent to Moûs(a) Muse + -ikos -ic
Related forms
musicless, adjective
antimusic, noun, adjective
undermusic, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for anti music

music

/ˈmjuːzɪk/
noun
1.
an art form consisting of sequences of sounds in time, esp tones of definite pitch organized melodically, harmonically, rhythmically and according to tone colour
2.
such an art form characteristic of a particular people, culture, or tradition Indian music, rock music, baroque music
3.
the sounds so produced, esp by singing or musical instruments
4.
written or printed music, such as a score or set of parts
5.
any sequence of sounds perceived as pleasing or harmonious
6.
(rare) a group of musicians the Queen's music
7.
(informal) face the music, to confront the consequences of one's actions
8.
music to one's ears, something that is very pleasant to hear his news is music to my ears
Word Origin
C13: via Old French from Latin mūsica, from Greek mousikē (tekhnē) (art) belonging to the Muses, from MousaMuse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for anti music
music
mid-13c., from O.Fr. musique (12c.), from L. musica, from Gk. mousike techne "art of the Muses," from fem. of mousikos "pertaining to the Muses," from Mousa "Muse." In classical Greece, any art in which the Muses presided, but especially music. The use of letters to denote music notes is probably at least from ancient Greece, as their numbering system was ill-suited to the job. Natural scales begin at C (not A) because in ancient times the minor mode was more often used than the major one. The natural minor scale begins at A. To face the music "accept the consequences" is from 1850; the exact image is uncertain, one theory ties it to stage performers, another to cavalry horses having to be taught to stay calm while the regimental band plays. To make (beautiful) music with someone "have sexual intercourse" is from 1967. Musicology "the study of the science of music" is from 1909.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for anti music
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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anti music in the Bible

Jubal was the inventor of musical instruments (Gen. 4:21). The Hebrews were much given to the cultivation of music. Their whole history and literature afford abundant evidence of this. After the Deluge, the first mention of music is in the account of Laban's interview with Jacob (Gen. 31:27). After their triumphal passage of the Red Sea, Moses and the children of Israel sang their song of deliverance (Ex. 15). But the period of Samuel, David, and Solomon was the golden age of Hebrew music, as it was of Hebrew poetry. Music was now for the first time systematically cultivated. It was an essential part of training in the schools of the prophets (1 Sam. 10:5; 19:19-24; 2 Kings 3:15; 1 Chr. 25:6). There now arose also a class of professional singers (2 Sam. 19:35; Eccl. 2:8). The temple, however, was the great school of music. In the conducting of its services large bands of trained singers and players on instruments were constantly employed (2 Sam. 6:5; 1 Chr. 15; 16; 23;5; 25:1-6). In private life also music seems to have held an important place among the Hebrews (Eccl. 2:8; Amos 6:4-6; Isa. 5:11, 12; 24:8, 9; Ps. 137; Jer. 48:33; Luke 15:25).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with anti music
In addition to the idiom beginning with music also see: face the music
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Word Value for anti

4
5
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