anti-dynastical

dynasty

[dahy-nuh-stee; British also din-uh-stee]
noun, plural dynasties.
1.
a sequence of rulers from the same family, stock, or group: the Ming dynasty.
2.
the rule of such a sequence.
3.
a series of members of a family who are distinguished for their success, wealth, etc.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin dynastīa < Greek dynasteia. See dynast, -y3

dynastic [dahy-nas-tik; British also dih-nas-tik] , dynastical, adjective
dynastically, adverb
antidynastic, adjective
antidynastical, adjective
antidynastically, adverb
antidynasty, adjective
nondynastic, adjective
nondynastical, adjective
nondynastically, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dynasty (ˈdɪnəstɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  a sequence of hereditary rulers: an Egyptian dynasty
2.  any sequence of powerful leaders of the same family: the Kennedy dynasty
 
[C15: via Late Latin from Greek dunasteia, from dunastēsdynast]
 
dynastic
 
adj
 
dy'nastical
 
adj
 
dy'nastically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dynasty
mid-15c., from L.L. dynastia, from Gk. dynasteia "power, lordship," from dynastes "ruler, chief," from dynasthai "have power." Related: Dynastic.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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