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Randolph

[ran-dolf, -duh lf] /ˈræn dɒlf, -dəlf/
noun
1.
A(sa) Philip, 1889–1979, U.S. labor leader: president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters 1925–68.
2.
Edmund Jennings
[jen-ings] /ˈdʒɛn ɪŋs/ (Show IPA),
1753–1813, U.S. statesman: first U.S. Attorney General 1789–94; secretary of state 1794–95.
3.
John, 1773–1833, U.S. statesman and author.
4.
a town in E Massachusetts, S of Boston.
5.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for ap randolph

Randolph

/ˈrændɒlf; -dəlf/
noun
1.
Edmund Jennings, 1753–1813, US politician. He was a member of the convention that framed the US constitution (1787), attorney general (1789–94), and secretary of state (1794–95)
2.
John, called Randolph of Roanoke. 1773–1833, US politician, noted for his eloquence: in 1820 he opposed the Missouri Compromise that outlawed slavery
3.
Sir Thomas; 1st Earl of Moray. Died 1332, Scottish soldier: regent after the death of Robert the Bruce (1329)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for ap randolph

Randolph

masc. proper name, from Old Norse Rannulfr "shield-wolf" and Frankish *Rannulf "raven-wolf," both brought to England by the Normans.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for ap randolph

Randolph

town (township), Norfolk county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S., 15 miles (24 km) south of Boston. Settled in 1710 as Cochato (named for the Cochato Indians), it was part of Braintree until separately incorporated in 1793. The town was renamed for Peyton Randolph, first president of the Continental Congress. Randolph developed as a shoe-manufacturing centre but is now primarily residential with retail trade, services, and some light manufacturing. It was the birthplace of Mary Wilkins Freeman, who wrote many of her stories about New England village life there. The Boston School for the Deaf was established (1899) in the town and flourished in the early 20th century. Area 10.5 square miles (27.2 square km). Pop. (1990) 30,093; (2000) 30,963.

Learn more about Randolph with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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