apoplectoid

apoplexy

[ap-uh-plek-see]
noun Pathology.
1.
stroke ( def 6 ).
2.
a sudden, usually marked loss of bodily function due to rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel.
3.
a hemorrhage into an organ cavity or tissue.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English apoplexie < Late Latin < Greek, equivalent to apóplēkt(os) (see apoplectic) + -ia -y3

apoplectiform [ap-uh-plek-tuh-fawrm] , apoplectoid, adjective
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World English Dictionary
apoplexy (ˈæpəˌplɛksɪ)
 
n
sudden loss of consciousness, often followed by paralysis, caused by rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel in the brain
 
[C14: from Old French apoplexie, from Late Latin apoplēxia, from Greek: from apoplēssein to cripple by a stroke, from plēssein to strike]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

apoplexy
late 14c., "sudden fit of paralysis and dizziness," from L.L. apoplexia, from Gk. apoplexia, from apoplessein "to strike down and incapacitate," from apo- "off" (see apo-), in this case probably an intensive prefix, + plessein "hit" (cf. plague,
also with a root sense of "stricken"). The L. translation, sideratio, means "disease caused by a constellation."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

apoplexy ap·o·plex·y (āp'ə-plěk'sē)
n.

  1. Sudden impairment of neurological function, especially from a cerebral hemorrhage; a stroke.

  2. An effusion of blood into a tissue or organ.

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