appellation

[ap-uh-ley-shuhn]
noun
1.
a name, title, or designation.
2.
appellative ( def 1 ).
3.
the act of naming.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English appelacion < Old French < Latin appellātiōn- (stem of appellātiō) a naming, equivalent to appellāt(us) (see appellate) + -iōn- -ion

misappellation, noun
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World English Dictionary
appellation (ˌæpɪˈleɪʃən)
 
n
1.  an identifying name or title
2.  the act of naming or giving a title to

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

appellation
late 15c., "action of appealing" (to a higher authority), from O.Fr. appellation (13c.), from L. appellationem (nom. appellatio), noun of action from appellare (see appeal). Meaning "designation, name given to a person, thing, or class" is from mid-15c., from a sense also found in M.Fr. appeler
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Then not one objected to parting with the generic appellations.
He buys the wine from local winemakers, and he does the same with prized
  appellations all over the state.
Indeed, many would doubtless take particular pride in claiming either of those
  appellations for themselves.
There also were phonetic transcriptions of native appellations.
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