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apply

[uh-plahy] /əˈplaɪ/
verb (used with object), applied, applying.
1.
to make use of as relevant, suitable, or pertinent:
to apply a theory to a problem.
2.
to put to use, especially for a particular purpose:
to apply pressure to open a door.
3.
to bring into action; use; employ:
He applied the brakes and skidded to a stop.
4.
to use a label or other designation:
Don't apply any such term to me.
5.
to use for or assign to a specific purpose:
He applied a portion of his salary each week to savings.
6.
to put into effect:
They applied the rules to new members only.
7.
to devote or employ diligently or with close attention:
to apply one's mind to a problem; to apply oneself to a task.
8.
to place in contact with; lay or spread on:
to apply paint to a wall; to apply a bandage to a wound.
9.
to bring into physical contact with or close proximity to:
to apply a match to gunpowder.
10.
to credit to, as an account:
to apply $10 to his account at the store.
verb (used without object), applied, applying.
11.
to be pertinent, suitable, or relevant:
The argument applies to the case. The theory doesn't apply.
12.
to make an application or request; ask:
to apply for a job; to apply for a raise.
13.
to lay or spread on:
The plastic coating is easy to apply on any surface.
14.
to be placed or remain in contact:
This paint doesn't apply very easily.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English ap(p)lien < Anglo-French, Old French ap(p)lier < Latin applicāre, equivalent to ap- ap-1 + plicāre to fold; see ply2
Related forms
appliable, adjective
appliableness, noun
appliably, adverb
applier, noun
preapply, verb (used with object), preapplied, preapplying.
reapply, verb, reapplied, reapplying.
unappliable, adjective
unappliably, adverb
Synonyms
3. utilize. 5. appropriate, allot, assign, dedicate. 12. petition, sue, entreat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for applying
  • applying fair taxes to all horse owners would create significant revenue and spur the economy.
  • He and the staff spent four days applying the wax panels, which are an inch thick.
  • He also began incorporating brighter colors and explored new ways of applying paint, using both brushes and palette knives.
  • The town is becoming a showcase for a series of firsts in applying energy-efficient standards.
  • Let deck dry for two days before applying a clear wood preservative with mildewcides and ultraviolet-light inhibitors.
  • List your hobbies and interests only if you can relate them to the position you're applying for.
  • The more you know about the company and the job you are applying for, the better you will appear in the interview.
  • Applicants who are applying from a country in which they are not a citizen must provide proof of their current immigration status.
  • In addition to this, you must present two photos of you as well as of any family members that are applying with you.
  • There are thousands of scholarships available for students applying to college and graduate school.
British Dictionary definitions for applying

apply

/əˈplaɪ/
verb -plies, -plying, -plied
1.
(transitive) to put to practical use; utilize; employ
2.
(intransitive) to be relevant, useful, or appropriate
3.
(transitive) to cause to come into contact with; put onto
4.
(intransitive) often foll by for. to put in an application or request
5.
(transitive) often foll by to. to devote (oneself, one's efforts) with diligence
6.
(transitive) to bring into operation or use: the police only applied the law to aliens
7.
(transitive) to refer (a word, epithet, etc) to a person or thing
Derived Forms
applier, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French aplier, from Latin applicāre to attach to
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for applying

apply

v.

late 14c., "to put (one's faculties, etc.) to some task or career," late 14c., from Old French aploiier "apply, use, attach" (12c., Modern French appliquer), from Latin applicare "attach to, join, connect;" figuratively, "devote (oneself) to, give attention," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + plicare "fold" (see ply (v.1)). The etymological sense is "bring things in contact with one another." Of lotions, from early 15c. Meaning "seek a job by submitting an application for one" is from 1851. A by-form applicate is recorded from 1530s. Related: Applied; applying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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