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approve

[uh-proov] /əˈpruv/
verb (used with object), approved, approving.
1.
to speak or think favorably of; pronounce or consider agreeable or good; judge favorably:
to approve the policies of the administration.
2.
to consent or agree to:
Father approved our plan to visit Chicago.
3.
to confirm or sanction formally; ratify:
The Senate promptly approved the bill.
4.
Obsolete.
  1. to demonstrate; show.
  2. to make good; attest.
  3. to prove by trial.
  4. to convict.
verb (used without object), approved, approving.
5.
to speak or consider favorably (sometimes followed by of):
Mother didn't approve of him. The boss wouldn't approve of the plan. He said that he approved.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English a(p)proven < Anglo-French, Old French aprover < Latin approbāre, equivalent to ap- ap-1 + probāre to prove
Related forms
approvedly, adverb
approvedness, noun
approvingly, adverb
nonapproved, adjective
preapprove, verb, preapproved, preapproving.
reapprove, verb, reapproved, reapproving.
self-approved, adjective
self-approving, adjective
unapproved, adjective
unapproving, adjective
unapprovingly, adverb
well-approved, adjective
Can be confused
approve, endorse (see synonym study at the current entry)
Synonyms
1. appreciate, esteem. Approve, commend, praise mean to have, and usually to express, a favorable opinion. To approve is to have a very good opinion, expressed or not, of someone or something: He approved the new plan. To commend is to speak or write approv-ingly, often formally and publicly, to congratulate or honor for something done: to commend a worker for a job well done. To praise is to speak or write, often in glowing and emotional terms, about one or more persons, actions, plans, etc.: to praise someone's courage. 2, 3. authorize, endorse, validate.
Antonyms
2, 3. reject.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for approved
  • All flowers and plants are approved for agricultural export.
  • If he betrayed too great weakness in obeying his prince at that time, he never approved his heresy.
  • Parliament had approved an austerity budget less than a month earlier.
  • Harvard is yet to comment officially on the proposed changes, which, although approved have not yet been fully designed.
  • It has also got bills approved by cleverly exploiting the opposition's divisions and picking off factions within it.
  • Once approved, some have encountered legal, financial and personal troubles.
  • Targeted wiretapping approved by a warrant is essential for fighting crime and terrorism.
  • But because of a small risk of allergic reaction in humans, the corn was approved only for animal feed.
  • Since calcium channels are only found in heart and brain tissue, the researchers sought a drug approved to block these pathways.
  • The global review found that current global fieldwork was following regionally approved ethical and scientific procedures.
British Dictionary definitions for approved

approve1

/əˈpruːv/
verb
1.
when intr, often foll by of. to consider fair, good, or right; commend (a person or thing)
2.
(transitive) to authorize or sanction
3.
(transitive) (obsolete) to demonstrate or prove by trial
Derived Forms
approvingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French aprover, from Latin approbāre to approve, from probāre to test, prove

approve2

/əˈpruːv/
verb
1.
(transitive) (law) to improve or increase the value of (waste or common land), as by enclosure
Word Origin
C15: from Old French approuer to turn to advantage, from prou advantage
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for approved

approve

v.

c.1300, "to demonstrate, prove;" mid-14c., "to attest (something) with authority," from Old French aprover (Modern French approuver) "approve, agree to," from Latin approbare "to assent to as good, regard as good," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + probare "to try, test something (to find if it is good)," from probus "honest, genuine" (see prove).

The meaning extended late 14c. to "to sanction, endorse, confirm formally" then to "assent to (something) as good" (early 15c.), especially in reference to the actions of authorities, parliaments, etc. Related: Approved; approving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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