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apropos

[ap-ruh-poh] /ˌæp rəˈpoʊ/
adverb
1.
fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.
2.
Obsolete. by the way.
adjective
3.
opportune; pertinent:
apropos remarks.
Idioms
4.
apropos of, with reference to; in respect or regard to:
apropos of the preceding statement.
Origin
1660-1670
1660-70; < French à propos literally, to purpose < Latin ad prōpositum. See ad-, proposition
Can be confused
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for apropos
  • For alphabetical and even musical clichés it's apropos.
  • The final note in the article about the need for insulation is apropos.
  • That's so cute and very apropos.
  • Any hearings now likely would be political, full of grandstanding, and apropos of little related to the actual events.
  • My guess then would be that race isn't really apropos to those holdouts.
  • There has to be something, short of riding boots, that would be apropos.
  • Suddenly, my quote seems frighteningly apropos.
  • Often, apropos of nothing, his villains will break into a momentary soft shoe.
  • Perhaps, but it's also apropos.
  • In any case, it's not an apropos analogy because of the reasons I outlined above.
British Dictionary definitions for apropos

apropos

/ˌæprəˈpəʊ/
adjective
1.
appropriate; pertinent
adverb
2.
appropriately or pertinently
3.
by the way; incidentally
4.
(preposition) apropos of, with regard to; in respect of
Word Origin
C17: from French à propos to the purpose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for apropos
adv.

1660s, "opportunely," from French à propos "to the purpose," from propos "thing said in conversation, talk; purpose, plan," from Latin propositium "purpose," past participle of proponere "to set forth, propose" (see propound). Meaning "as regards" is 1761, from French. As an adjective, "to the point or purpose," from 1690s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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