follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

argue

[ahr-gyoo] /ˈɑr gyu/
verb (used without object), argued, arguing.
1.
to present reasons for or against a thing:
He argued in favor of capital punishment.
2.
to contend in oral disagreement; dispute:
The senator argued with the president about the new tax bill.
verb (used with object), argued, arguing.
3.
to state the reasons for or against:
The lawyers argued the case.
4.
to maintain in reasoning:
to argue that the news report must be wrong.
5.
to persuade, drive, etc., by reasoning:
to argue someone out of a plan.
6.
to show; prove; imply; indicate:
His clothes argue poverty.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French arguer < Latin argūtāre, -ārī, frequentative of arguere to prove, assert, accuse (Medieval Latin: argue, reason), though Latin frequentative form attested only in sense “babble, chatter”
Related forms
arguer, noun
counterargue, verb, counterargued, counterarguing.
overargue, verb, overargued, overarguing.
reargue, verb, reargued, rearguing.
well-argued, adjective
Synonyms
1, 2. Argue, debate, discuss imply using reasons or proofs to support or refute an assertion, proposition, or principle. Argue implies presenting one's reasons: The scientists argued for a safer testing procedure; it may also imply disputing in an angry or excited way: His parents argue all the time. To discuss is to present varied opinions and views: to discuss ways and means. To debate is to interchange formal (usually opposing) arguments, especially on public questions: to debate a proposed amendment.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for arguing
  • Nothing, it would seem, could stop an ornery baseball manager from arguing with an umpire.
  • University officials had lobbied to prevent those cutbacks, arguing that they would damage academic studies conducted there.
  • Their reason for arguing that it is the only one is that only one is necessary.
  • arguing that the practice encourages attacks, critics call for broader bans.
  • No point in getting your blood pressure up arguing with climate change deniers.
  • The networks are relaying images of street fights and chaos, and observers are arguing about the semantics of looting.
  • Good science does not include spending your time and space arguing about things that are outside the domain of science.
  • Many voter rights' advocates are fighting to decertify electronic voting machines, arguing they're not reliable.
  • However, officials were left arguing about what had actually happened.
  • The impact on biodiversity is dire, they say, arguing for a radical rethinking of conservation policies in place today.
British Dictionary definitions for arguing

argue

/ˈɑːɡjuː/
verb -gues, -guing, -gued
1.
(intransitive) to quarrel; wrangle they were always arguing until I arrived
2.
(intransitive; often foll by for or against) to present supporting or opposing reasons or cases in a dispute; reason
3.
(transitive; may take a clause as object) to try to prove by presenting reasons; maintain
4.
(transitive; often passive) to debate or discuss the case was fully argued before agreement was reached
5.
(transitive) to persuade he argued me into going
6.
(transitive) to give evidence of; suggest her looks argue despair
Derived Forms
arguer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French arguer to assert, charge with, from Latin arguere to make clear, accuse; related to Latin argūtus clear, argentum silver
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for arguing

argue

v.

c.1300, "to make reasoned statements to prove or refute a proposition," from Old French arguer "maintain an opinion or view; harry, reproach, accuse, blame" (12c.), from Latin argutare "to prattle, prate," frequentative of arguere "make clear, make known, prove, declare, demonstrate," from PIE *argu-yo-, from root *arg- "to shine, be white, bright, clear" (see argent). Meaning "to oppose, dispute" is from late 14c. Related: Argued; arguing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for argue

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for arguing

9
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with arguing

Nearby words for arguing