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7 Essential Words of Fall

ascending

[uh-sen-ding] /əˈsɛn dɪŋ/
adjective
1.
moving upward; rising.
2.
Botany. growing or directed upward, especially obliquely or in a curve from the base.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English; see ascend, -ing2
Related forms
ascendingly, adverb
subascending, adjective

ascend

[uh-send] /əˈsɛnd/
verb (used without object)
1.
to move, climb, or go upward; mount; rise:
The airplane ascended into the clouds.
2.
to slant upward.
3.
to rise to a higher point, rank, or degree; proceed from an inferior to a superior degree or level:
to ascend to the presidency.
4.
to go toward the source or beginning; go back in time.
5.
Music. to rise in pitch; pass from any tone to a higher one.
verb (used with object)
6.
to go or move upward upon or along; climb; mount:
to ascend a lookout tower; to ascend stairs.
7.
to gain or succeed to; acquire:
to ascend the throne.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English ascenden < Anglo-French ascendre < Latin ascendere to climb up, equivalent to a- a-5 + -scendere, combining form of scandere to climb. See scan
Related forms
ascendable, ascendible, adjective
reascend, verb
unascendable, adjective
unascended, adjective
Synonyms
1. soar. 6. See climb.
Antonyms
1, 6. descend.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ascending
  • Here, in ascending order of brightness, are three consoling thoughts.
  • If temperatures keep ascending at their current rate, some troglobites may not adjust rapidly enough.
  • In fact, temperatures are ascending rapidly, and this effect is especially powerful in alpine regions.
  • There are four main possibilities, given in ascending order of politeness.
  • The fish constrained inside the bubble net are pinned against the surface by the ascending whales.
  • Each layer of fruits in the ascending spiral is called a hand.
  • Ocellated turkeys were ascending to the trees for the night, their wings laboring against the plush air.
  • It seems to me you're asking three questions, in ascending order of complexity.
  • One early morning, as they camped on a rock face they were ascending, gunfire shattered the dawn.
  • After ascending as far as they could by carriage and wagon, the party set off on foot.
British Dictionary definitions for ascending

ascending

/əˈsɛndɪŋ/
adjective
1.
moving upwards; rising
2.
(botany) sloping or curving upwards: the ascending stem of a vine

ascend

/əˈsɛnd/
verb
1.
to go or move up (a ladder, hill, slope, etc); mount; climb
2.
(intransitive) to slope or incline upwards
3.
(intransitive) to rise to a higher point, level, degree, etc
4.
to follow (a river) upstream towards its source
5.
to trace (a genealogy, etc) back in time
6.
to sing or play (a scale, arpeggio, etc) from the lower to higher notes
7.
ascend the throne, to become king or queen
Word Origin
C14: from Latin ascendere, from scandere
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ascending

ascend

v.

late 14c., from Latin ascendere "to climb up, mount, ascend," figuratively "to rise, reach," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + scandere "to climb" (see scan (v.)). Also in 15c. used with a sense "to mount (a female) for copulation." Related: Ascended; ascending. An Old English word for it was stigan.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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