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ascites

[uh-sahy-teez] /əˈsaɪ tiz/
noun, Pathology
1.
accumulation of serous fluid in the peritoneal cavity; dropsy of the peritoneum.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English aschites < Medieval Latin < Greek askítēs (hýdrōps) abdominal (dropsy), equivalent to ask(ós) belly + -itēs -ite1
Related forms
ascitic
[uh-sit-ik] /əˈsɪt ɪk/ (Show IPA),
ascitical, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ascites
  • Although ascites itself is not fatal, it is a marker for severe progression.
  • Spontaneous peritonitis is usually caused by infection of ascites, a collection of fluid in the peritoneal cavity.
  • Spontaneous peritonitis is usually caused by ascites, a collection of fluid in the peritoneal cavity.
British Dictionary definitions for ascites

ascites

/əˈsaɪtiːz/
noun (pl) ascites
1.
accumulation of serous fluid in the peritoneal cavity
Derived Forms
ascitic (əˈsɪtɪk) adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Latin: a kind of dropsy, from Greek askitēs, from askos wineskin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ascites
n.

late 14c., "abdominal dropsy," from Latin ascites, from Greek askites (hydrops), literally "baglike dropsy," from askos "bag, sac."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ascites in Medicine

ascites as·ci·tes (ə-sī'tēz)
n. pl. ascites
The accumulation of serous fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Also called hydroperitoneum.


as·cit'ic (-sĭt'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for ascites

accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity, between the membrane lining the abdominal wall and the membrane covering the abdominal organs. The most common causes of ascites are cirrhosis of the liver, heart failure, tumours of the peritoneal membranes, and escape of chyle (lymph laden with emulsified fats) into the peritoneal cavity. In patients having liver disease, the onset of ascites is usually preceded by accumulation of fluid in the ankles. The abdomen is often uncomfortably distended, and muscles become wasted.

Learn more about ascites with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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