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ashore

[uh-shawr, uh-shohr] /əˈʃɔr, əˈʃoʊr/
adverb
1.
to the shore; onto the shore:
The schooner was driven ashore.
2.
on the shore; on land rather than at sea or on the water:
The captain has been ashore for two hours.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; a-1 + shore1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ashore
  • The storm came ashore at the time of the high tide, which added to the surge of water being pushed ahead by the hurricane.
  • Lambert came on one close up in a shallow lake, and in its fright it galloped ashore, churning through the mud and water.
  • Most people reached land by lifeboats but some swam ashore and others were rescued by helicopters.
  • But as a storm nears land, the rising sea floor blocks the building water pile's escape and it comes ashore as deadly storm surge.
  • And if commandos are gonna make it ashore, a successful prototype will need to be nearly as discreet as they are.
  • There is little evidence that big hurricanes come ashore any more often than, say, a century ago.
  • When the splintered remains of his tiny vessel drifted ashore six weeks later, he was presumed drowned.
  • When the ice breaks up in the summer, the bears come ashore by the hundreds to wait for the autumn refreeze.
  • The splintered remains of his vessel washed ashore six weeks later.
  • Smaller sea scorpions are known to have crawled ashore to mate or shed their outer skins.
British Dictionary definitions for ashore

ashore

/əˈʃɔː/
adverb
1.
towards or onto land from the water: we swam ashore
adjective, adverb (postpositive)
2.
on land, having come from the water: a day ashore before sailing
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ashore
adv.

1580s, "toward the shore," from a- (1) + shore (n.). Meaning "on the shore" is from 1630s. Middle English had ashore (late 15c.), but it meant "on a slant," literally "propped up," from shore (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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