aspirate

[v. as-puh-reyt; n., adj., as-per-it]
verb (used with object), aspirated, aspirating.
1.
Phonetics.
a.
to articulate (a speech sound, especially a stop) so as to produce an audible puff of breath, as with the first t of total, the second t being unaspirated.
b.
to articulate (the beginning of a word or syllable) with an h -sound, as in which, pronounced (hwich), or hitch as opposed to witch or itch.
2.
Medicine/Medical.
a.
to remove (a fluid) from a body cavity by use of an aspirator or suction syringe.
b.
to inhale (fluid or a foreign body) into the bronchi and lungs, often after vomiting.
3.
to draw or remove by suction.
noun
4.
Phonetics. a speech sound having as an obvious concomitant an audible puff of breath, as initial stop consonants or initial h -sounds.
5.
Medicine/Medical. the substance or contents that have been aspirated.
adjective
6.
Phonetics. (of a speech sound) pronounced with or accompanied by aspiration; aspirated.

Origin:
1660–70; < Latin aspīrātus breathed upon (past participle of aspīrāre). See aspire, -ate1

nonaspirate, noun, adjective
nonaspirated, adjective
nonaspirating, adjective
unaspirated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
aspirate
 
vb
1.  phonetics
 a.  to articulate (a stop) with some force, so that breath escapes with audible friction as the stop is released
 b.  to pronounce (a word or syllable) with an initial h
2.  to draw in or remove by inhalation or suction, esp to suck (air or fluid) from a body cavity or to inhale (fluid) into the lungs after vomiting
3.  to supply air to (an internal-combustion engine)
 
n
4.  phonetics
 a.  a stop pronounced with an audible release of breath
 b.  the glottal fricative represented in English and several other languages as h
 
adj
5.  phonetics (of a stop) pronounced with a forceful and audible expulsion of breath

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

aspirate
1725, "sound of the letter 'H'," especially at the beginning of a word, from L. aspiratio "a breathing, exhalation, the pronunciation of the letter H" (see aspire).

aspirate
"to pronounce with audible breath," 1700, from L. aspiratus, pp. of aspirare (see aspire).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

aspirate as·pi·rate (ās'pə-rāt')
v. as·pi·rat·ed, as·pi·rat·ing, as·pi·rates
To take in or remove by aspiration. n. (-pər-ĭt)
A substance removed by aspiration.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

aspirate

the sound h as in English "hat." Consonant sounds such as the English voiceless stops p, t, and k at the beginning of words (e.g., "pat," "top," "keel") are also aspirated because they are pronounced with an accompanying forceful expulsion of air. Such sounds are not aspirated at the end of words or in combination with certain consonants (e.g., in "spot," "stop"). The voiced stops b and d in Sanskrit and Hindi also have aspirated forms that are usually transliterated as bh and dh.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy are routinely performed to determine whether the disease has spread.
The other procedures aspirate stem cells from the bone marrow.
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