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astronomy

[uh-stron-uh-mee] /əˈstrɒn ə mi/
noun
1.
the science that deals with the material universe beyond the earth's atmosphere.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English astronomie (< Anglo-French) < Latin astronomia < Greek. See astro-, -nomy
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for astronomy
  • The discovery of habitable planets around other stars is one of the great goals of modern astronomy.
  • Already, students have created personalized applications in study areas such as astronomy.
  • The invention of the telescope sparked Galileo's interest in astronomy and his subsequent discoveries led to his arrest.
  • Radio astronomy began with static.
  • His particular interest is astronomy, and he'd love to go to outer space.
  • They are spectacular phenomena even by the inflated standards of astronomy.
  • Backyard astronomy is a fantastic hobby.
  • Both astronomy buffs and armchair explorers will revel in his tale.
  • Both astronomy and paleontology qualify as sciences.
  • It was 1933, and this was the birth of radio astronomy.
British Dictionary definitions for astronomy

astronomy

/əˈstrɒnəmɪ/
noun
1.
the scientific study of the individual celestial bodies (excluding the earth) and of the universe as a whole. Its various branches include astrometry, astrodynamics, cosmology, and astrophysics
Word Origin
C13: from Old French astronomie, from Latin astronomia, from Greek; see astro-, -nomy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for astronomy
n.

c.1200, from Old French astrenomie, from Latin astronomia, from Greek astronomia, literally "star arrangement," from astron "star" (see astro-) + nomos "arranging, regulating," related to nemein "to deal out" (see numismatics). Used earlier than astrology and originally including it.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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astronomy in Science
astronomy
  (ə-strŏn'ə-mē)   
The scientific study of the universe and the objects in it, including stars, planets, nebulae, and galaxies. Astronomy deals with the position, size, motion, composition, energy, and evolution of celestial objects. Astronomers analyze not only visible light but also radio waves, x-rays, and other ranges of radiation that come from sources outside the Earth's atmosphere.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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astronomy in Culture

astronomy definition


The science that deals with the universe beyond the Earth. It describes the nature, position, and motion of the stars, planets, and other objects in the skies, and their relation to the Earth.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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astronomy in the Bible

The Hebrews were devout students of the wonders of the starry firmanent (Amos 5:8; Ps. 19). In the Book of Job, which is the oldest book of the Bible in all probability, the constellations are distinguished and named. Mention is made of the "morning star" (Rev. 2:28; comp. Isa. 14:12), the "seven stars" and "Pleiades," "Orion," "Arcturus," the "Great Bear" (Amos 5:8; Job 9:9; 38:31), "the crooked serpent," Draco (Job 26:13), the Dioscuri, or Gemini, "Castor and Pollux" (Acts 28:11). The stars were called "the host of heaven" (Isa. 40:26; Jer. 33:22). The oldest divisions of time were mainly based on the observation of the movements of the heavenly bodies, the "ordinances of heaven" (Gen. 1:14-18; Job 38:33; Jer. 31:35; 33:25). Such observations led to the division of the year into months and the mapping out of the appearances of the stars into twelve portions, which received from the Greeks the name of the "zodiac." The word "Mazzaroth" (Job 38:32) means, as the margin notes, "the twelve signs" of the zodiac. Astronomical observations were also necessary among the Jews in order to the fixing of the proper time for sacred ceremonies, the "new moons," the "passover," etc. Many allusions are found to the display of God's wisdom and power as seen in the starry heavens (Ps. 8; 19:1-6; Isa. 51:6, etc.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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