astute

[uh-stoot, uh-styoot]
adjective
1.
of keen penetration or discernment; sagacious: an astute analysis.
2.
clever; cunning; ingenious; shrewd: an astute merchandising program; an astute manipulation of facts.

Origin:
1605–15; < Latin astūtus shrewd, sly, cunning, equivalent to astū- (stem of astus) cleverness + -tus adj. suffix

astutely, adverb
astuteness, noun


1. smart, quick, perceptive. 2. artful, crafty, wily, sly.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
astute (əˈstjuːt)
 
adj
having insight or acumen; perceptive; shrewd
 
[C17: from Latin astūtus cunning, from astus (n) cleverness]
 
as'tutely
 
adv
 
as'tuteness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

astute
1610s, from L. astutus "crafty," from astus "cunning, cleverness, adroitness," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Gk. asty "town," a word borrowed into L. and with an overtone of "city sophistication." Related: Astuteness (1843).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It will be essential for students as future citizens to be able to navigate
  these media astutely.
On the other hand, as some commentators have astutely pointed out, the footnote
  is not the be-all and end-all.
He astutely read the tea-leaves of public opinion but had no grand vision.
As the author astutely pointed out, the cost of enforcement should have no
  bearing on whether the law is enforced.
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