at someones beck and call

beck

1 [bek]
noun
1.
a gesture used to signal, summon, or direct someone.
2.
Chiefly Scot. a bow or curtsy of greeting.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
3.
Archaic. beckon.
Idioms
4.
at someone's beck and call, ready to do someone's bidding; subject to someone's slightest wish: He has three servants at his beck and call.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English becken, short variant of becnen to beckon

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
beck1 (bɛk)
 
n
1.  a nod, wave, or other gesture or signal
2.  at someone's beck and call ready to obey someone's orders instantly; subject to someone's slightest whim
 
[C14: short for becnen to beckon]

beck2 (bɛk)
 
n
(in N England) a stream, esp a swiftly flowing one
 
[Old English becc, from Old Norse bekkr; related to Old English bece, Old Saxon beki, Old High German bah brook, Sanskrit bhanga wave]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

beck
late 14c., "mute signal," from bekken (v.), var. of becnan "to beckon" (see beckon). Transferred sense of "slightest indication of will" is from late 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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