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Ate

[ey-tee, ah-tee] /ˈeɪ ti, ˈɑ ti/
noun
1.
an ancient Greek goddess personifying the fatal blindness or recklessness that produces crime and the divine punishment that follows it.
Origin
< Greek, special use of átē reckless impulse, ruin, akin to aáein to mislead, harm
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for ates

ate

/ɛt; eɪt/
verb
1.
the past tense of eat

Ate

/ˈeɪtɪ; ˈɑːtɪ/
noun
1.
(Greek myth) a goddess who makes men blind so that they will blunder into guilty acts
Word Origin
C16: via Latin from Greek atē a rash impulse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for ates

ate

past tense of eat (q.v.).

Ate

Greek goddess of infatuation and evil, from ate "infatuation, bane, ruin, mischief," of uncertain origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Related Abbreviations for ates

ATE

automatic test equipment
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for ates

Ate

Greek mythological figure who induced rash and ruinous actions by both gods and men. She made Zeus-on the day he expected the Greek hero Heracles, his son by Alcmene, to be born-take an oath: the child born of his lineage that day would rule "over all those dwelling about him" (Iliad, Book XIX). Zeus's wife, the goddess Hera, implored her daughter Eileithyia, the goddess of childbirth, to delay Heracles' birth and to hasten that of another child of the lineage, Eurystheus, who would therefore become ruler of Mycenae and have Heracles as his subject. Having been deceived, Zeus cast Ate out of Olympus, after which she remained on earth, working evil and mischief. Zeus later sent to earth the Litai ("Prayers"), his old and crippled daughters, who followed Ate and repaired the harm done by her.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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