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attend

[uh-tend] /əˈtɛnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to be present at:
to attend a lecture; to attend church.
2.
to go with as a concomitant or result; accompany:
Fever may attend a cold. Success attended her hard work.
3.
to take care of; minister to; devote one's services to:
The nurse attended the patient daily.
4.
to wait upon; accompany as a companion or servant:
The retainers attended their lord.
5.
to take charge of; watch over; look after; tend; guard:
to attend one's health.
6.
to listen to; give heed to.
7.
Archaic. to wait for; expect.
verb (used without object)
8.
to take care or charge:
to attend to a sick person.
9.
to apply oneself:
to attend to one's work.
10.
to pay attention; listen or watch attentively; direct one's thought; pay heed:
to attend to a speaker.
11.
to be present:
She is a member but does not attend regularly.
12.
to be present and ready to give service; wait (usually followed by on or upon):
to attend upon the Queen.
13.
to follow; be consequent (usually followed by on or upon).
14.
Obsolete. to wait.
Origin of attend
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English atenden < Anglo-French, Old French atendre < Latin attendere to bend to, notice. See at-, tend1
Related forms
attender, noun
attendingly, adverb
well-attended, adjective
Synonyms
4. See accompany.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for attended
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Dinner over, he and Emmie attended to the dishes, he washing and she wiping.

    Cy Whittaker's Place Joseph C. Lincoln
  • Eucoline, the daughter of Agatho, attended me, carrying a lighted torch.

    Philothea Lydia Maria Child
  • I was a pupil at the University and attended his class in physics.

  • Cleonica, attended by Geta and Milza, travelled under the same protection.

    Philothea Lydia Maria Child
  • She had not attended the gatherings of the Circle at his house for a considerable time.

British Dictionary definitions for attended

attend

/əˈtɛnd/
verb
1.
to be present at (an event, meeting, etc)
2.
when intr, foll by to. to give care; minister
3.
when intr, foll by to. to pay attention; listen
4.
(transitive; often passive) to accompany or follow: a high temperature attended by a severe cough
5.
(intransitive; foll by on or upon) to follow as a consequence (of)
6.
(intransitive) foll by to. to devote one's time; apply oneself: to attend to the garden
7.
(transitive) to escort or accompany
8.
(intransitive; foll by on or upon) to wait (on); serve; provide for the needs (of): to attend on a guest
9.
(transitive) (archaic) to wait for; expect
10.
(intransitive) (obsolete) to delay
Derived Forms
attender, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French atendre, from Latin attendere to stretch towards, from tendere to extend
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for attended

attend

v.

c.1300, "to direct one's mind or energies," from Old French atendre (12c., Modern French attendre) "to expect, wait for, pay attention," and directly from Latin attendere "give heed to," literally "to stretch toward," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + tendere "stretch" (see tenet). The notion is of "stretching" one's mind toward something. Sense of "take care of, wait upon" is from early 14c. Meaning "to pay attention" is early 15c.; that of "to be in attendance" is mid-15c. Related: Attended; attending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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