augment

[v. awg-ment; n. awg-ment]
verb (used with object)
1.
to make larger; enlarge in size, number, strength, or extent; increase: His salary is augmented by a small inheritance.
2.
Music.
a.
to raise (the upper note of an interval or chord) by a half step.
b.
to double the note values of (a theme): In the fugue's development the subject is augmented.
3.
Grammar. to add an augment to.
4.
Heraldry. to grant an augmentation to (a coat of arms).
verb (used without object)
5.
to become larger.
noun
6.
Grammar. a prefixed vowel or a lengthening of the initial vowel that characterizes certain forms in the nonpresent inflection of verbs in Greek, Sanskrit, Armenian, and Phrygian.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English au(g)menten < Anglo-French, Middle French au(g)menter < Late Latin augmentāre to increase, derivative of augmentum an increase (aug(ēre) to increase (akin to eke) + -mentum -ment) + -ā- thematic vowel + -re infinitive ending

augmentable, adjective
unaugmentable, adjective
unaugmented, adjective


1. swell. See increase. 5. increase.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
augment
 
vb
1.  to make or become greater in number, amount, strength, etc; increase
2.  (tr) music Compare diminish to increase (a major or perfect interval) by a semitone
3.  (tr) (in Greek and Sanskrit grammar) to prefix a vowel or diphthong to (a verb) to form a past tense
 
n
4.  (in Greek and Sanskrit grammar) a vowel or diphthong prefixed to a verb to form a past tense
 
[C15: from Late Latin augmentāre to increase, from augmentum growth, from Latin augēre to increase]
 
aug'mentable
 
adj
 
aug'mentor
 
n
 
aug'menter
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

augment
c.1400, from O.Fr. augmenter (14c.), from L.L. augmentare "to increase," from L. augmentum "an increase," from augere "to increase, make big, enlarge, enrich," from PIE base *aug- "to increase" (cf. Skt. ojas- "strength;" Lith. augu "to grow," aukstas "high, of superior rank;" Gk. auxo "increase," auxein
"to increase;" Goth. aukan "to grow, increase;" O.E. eacien "to increase").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
From mines too is drawn what is necessary for maintaining and augmenting that
  part of it which consists in money.
It is the rich lushness of the other's inner being that begins to feel
  augmenting and transformative to them both.
Nature evolved genes to constrain energy as long as possible and to replicate
  for augmenting the amount of constrained energy.
We've been slowly augmenting our left-hemisphere since the invention of
  language.
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