B. mitre

Mitre

[mee-trey; Spanish mee-tre]
noun
Bartolomé [bahr-taw-law-me] , 1821–1906, Argentine soldier, statesman, and author: president of Argentina 1862–68.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
mitre or (US) miter (ˈmaɪtə)
 
n
1.  Christianity the liturgical headdress of a bishop or abbot, in most western churches consisting of a tall pointed cleft cap with two bands hanging down at the back
2.  short for mitre joint
3.  a bevelled surface of a mitre joint
4.  (in sewing) a diagonal join where the hems along two sides meet at a corner of the fabric
 
vb
5.  to make a mitre joint between (two pieces of material, esp wood)
6.  to make a mitre in (a fabric)
7.  to confer a mitre upon: a mitred abbot
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin mitra, from Greek mitra turban]
 
miter or (US) miter
 
n
 
vb
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin mitra, from Greek mitra turban]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

mitre
"bishop's tall hat," late 14c., from O.Fr. mitre, from L. mitra, from Gk. mitra "headband, turban," earlier a piece of armor worn about the waist, from PIE base *mei- "to tie" (cf. Skt. Mitrah, O.Pers. Mithra-, god names; Rus. mir "world, peace," Gk. mitos "a warp thread"). In L., "a kind of headdress
common among Asiatics, the wearing of which by men was regarded in Rome as a mark of effeminacy" [OED]. But the word was used in Vulgate to translate Heb. micnepheth "headdress of a priest."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Mitre definition


(Heb. mitsnepheth), something rolled round the head; the turban or head-dress of the high priest (Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6, etc.). In the Authorized Version of Ezek. 21:26, this Hebrew word is rendered "diadem," but in the Revised Version, "mitre." It was a twisted band of fine linen, 8 yards in length, coiled into the form of a cap, and worn on official occasions (Lev. 8:9; 16:4; Zech. 3:5). On the front of it was a golden plate with the inscription, "Holiness to the Lord." The mitsnepheth differed from the mitre or head-dress (migba'ah) of the common priest. (See BONNET.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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