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bachelor's

[bach-uh-lerz, bach-lerz] /ˈbætʃ ə lərz, ˈbætʃ lərz/
noun, Informal.

bachelor

[bach-uh-ler, bach-ler] /ˈbætʃ ə lər, ˈbætʃ lər/
noun
1.
an unmarried man.
2.
a person who has been awarded a bachelor's degree.
3.
a fur seal, especially a young male, kept from the breeding grounds by the older males.
4.
Also called bachelor-at-arms. a young knight who followed the banner of another.
5.
Also called household knight. a landless knight.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English bacheler < Old French < Vulgar Latin *baccalār(is) farm hand; akin to Late Latin baccalāria piece of land, orig. plural of *baccalārium dairy farm, equivalent to *baccālis of cows (bacca, variant of Latin vacca cow + -ālis -al1) + -ārium place
Related forms
bachelorlike, adjective
bachelorly, adjective
nonbachelor, noun
prebachelor, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for bachelors
  • Both were lifelong bachelors and workaholics, fueled by intense political ambition.
  • One day a group of gelada bachelors were sitting behind us on a hillside intently studying a couple of family groups.
  • Many, including me, have turned down engagement rings from eligible bachelors even as our biological alarm bells started sounding.
  • But here's an inconvenient fact: the seven fastest growing jobs in health services don't require a bachelors degree, at all.
  • They both live in grim furnished lodgings for bachelors.
  • The seven fastest growing jobs in health and human services don't require a bachelors degree, at all.
  • bachelors and would-be-manly boys are not the only consumers of tobacco, though they are the best patrons of the bar.
  • Still, as the price of a bachelors degree continues to rise, graduation rates have stagnated.
  • They help protect the band and scare away the bachelors.
  • Wild horses live in two groups: families and bachelors.
British Dictionary definitions for bachelors

bachelor

/ˈbætʃələ; ˈbætʃlə/
noun
1.
  1. an unmarried man
  2. (as modifier): a bachelor flat
2.
  1. a person who holds the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Science, etc
  2. the degree itself
3.
Also called bachelor-at-arms. (in the Middle Ages) a young knight serving a great noble
4.
bachelor seal, a young male seal, esp a fur seal, that has not yet mated
Derived Forms
bachelorhood, noun
Usage note
Gender-neutral form: single person
Word Origin
C13: from Old French bacheler youth, squire, from Vulgar Latin baccalāris (unattested) farm worker, of Celtic origin; compare Irish Gaelic bachlach peasant
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bachelors

bachelor

n.

c.1300, "young man;" also "youthful knight, novice in arms," from Old French bacheler (11c.) "knight bachelor," a young squire in training for knighthood, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Medieval Latin baccalarius "vassal farmer," one who helps or tends a baccalaria "section of land." Or from Latin baculum "a stick," because the squire would practice with a staff, not a sword. Meaning evolved from "knight in training" to "young unmarried man" (early 14c.). Bachelor party as a pre-wedding ritual is from 1882.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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