baking powder

noun
any of various powders used as a substitute for yeast in baking, composed of sodium bicarbonate mixed with an acid substance, as cream of tartar, capable of setting carbon dioxide free when the mixture is moistened, causing the dough to rise.

Origin:
1840–50

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To baking powder
Collins
World English Dictionary
baking powder
 
n
any of various powdered mixtures that contain sodium bicarbonate, starch (usually flour), and one or more slightly acidic compounds, such as cream of tartar: used in baking as a substitute for yeast

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
baking powder   (bā'kĭng)  Pronunciation Key 
A mixture of baking soda, a nonreactive filler (such as starch), and at least one slightly acidic compound (such as cream of tartar). Baking powder works as a leavening agent in baking by releasing carbon dioxide when mixed with a liquid, such as milk or water.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Whisk together flour and baking powder in a large bowl.
Sift together flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt into a medium bowl.
Baking powder is a cooking product that helps batter to rise.
Sift flour, baking powder, sugar and salt into a large mixing bowl.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature