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Barrow

[bar-oh] /ˈbær oʊ/
noun
1.
Also called Barrow-in-Furness
[bar-oh-in-fur-nis] /ˈbær oʊ ɪnˈfɜr nɪs/ (Show IPA)
. a seaport in Cumbria, in NW England.
2.
Point, the N tip of Alaska: the northernmost point of the U.S.
3.
a town in N Alaska, S of Barrow Point: site of a government science-research center.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for bar row in furness'

barrow1

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
2.
Also called barrowful. the amount contained in or on a barrow
3.
(mainly Brit) a handcart, typically having two wheels and a canvas roof, used esp by street vendors
4.
(Northern English, dialect) concern or business (esp in the phrases that's not my barrow, that's just my barrow)
5.
(Irish & Scot, dialect) into one's barrow, suited to one's interests or desires
Word Origin
Old English bearwe; related to Old Norse bararbier, Old High German bāra

barrow2

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a heap of earth placed over one or more prehistoric tombs, often surrounded by ditches. Long barrows are elongated Neolithic mounds usually covering stone burial chambers; round barrows are Bronze Age, covering burials or cremations
Word Origin
Old English beorg; related to Old Norse bjarg, Gothic bairgahei hill, Old High German berg mountain

barrow3

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a castrated pig
Word Origin
Old English bearg; related to Old Norse börgr, Old High German barug

Barrow

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a river in SE Ireland, rising in the Slieve Bloom Mountains and flowing south to Waterford Harbour. Length: about 193 km (120 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bar row in furness'
barrow
"vehicle for carrying a load," c.1300, barewe, probably from an unrecorded O.E. *bearwe "basket, barrow," from beran "to bear, to carry" (see bear (v.)).
barrow
"mound," O.E. beorg (W.Saxon), berg (Anglian) "hill," from P.Gmc. *bergaz (cf. O.S., O.Fris., O.H.G. berg "mountain," O.N. bjarg "rock"), from PIE base *bheregh- "high, elevated" (cf. O.C.S. bregu "mountain, height," O.Ir. brigh "mountain," Skt. b'rhant "high," O.Pers. bard- "be high"). Obsolete except in place-names and southwest England dialect by 1400; revived by archaeology. Barrow-wight first recorded 1891.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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