barrister

[bar-uh-ster]
noun Law.
1.
(in England) a lawyer who is a member of one of the Inns of Court and who has the privilege of pleading in the higher courts. Compare solicitor ( def 4 ).
2.
Informal. any lawyer.

Origin:
1535–45; derivative of bar1, perhaps after obsolete legister lawyer or minister

barristerial [bar-uh-steer-ee-uhl] , adjective
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World English Dictionary
barrister (ˈbærɪstə)
 
n
1.  Compare solicitor advocate See also counsel Also called: barrister-at-law (in England) a lawyer who has been called to the bar and is qualified to plead in the higher courts
2.  (in Canada) a lawyer who pleads in court
3.  (US) a less common word for lawyer
 
[C16: from bar1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

barrister
1540s, "a student of law who has been called to the bar," from bar (3) in the legal sense. Also see attorney.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for barristers
Chorus of bridesmaids, gentlemen of the jury, barristers, attorneys and public.
Barristers are also engaged by solicitors to provide specialist advice on points of law.
In court, barristers are often visibly distinguished from solicitors by their apparel.
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